Take a Better Bite: Healthy Grain Bowls

Healthy Grain Bowl = Grain + Green + Protein + Produce + Enhancement 

 

Pain. The Good. The Bad. What’s the Difference?

There is a sort of spectrum when it comes to how people interrupt pain: there are those that do not tolerate discomfort of any kind and then there are those that don’t think they are going to see progress until they work themselves into an injury. There is a fine line between these two groups and it is that sweet spot that we find strength, flexibility and endurance to tolerate all of our desired activities.

When working on flexibility and strength, we must push past our current level of strength and flexibility which leads to muscles burning from fatigue or muscles straining because of an increased stretch. This will likely cause some muscle soreness the following day showing that your muscles were challenged in a way that will encourage them to build. It is important when working on an exercise program to differentiate these types of discomfort from true and harmful pain.

On the other side, if you are repeatedly performing activities that cause sharp, shooting or pinching pain, you are inevitably going to hurt that muscle/joint leading to restricted motion all together. Too often, we meet with new physical therapy patients to learn that they continue to perform the exercises that hurt them simply because they think that is normal. We cannot say it enough: PAIN IS NOT NORMAL. When it is more than just discomfort, when it comes back again and again, when it just doesn’t go away – that’s the harmful type of pain. The good news is, we can help. Not only can physical therapy relieve pain but it can be help avoid pain in the future!

Call 751-2974 to schedule a consult with a P50 Physical Therapist

3 Ways to Find TIME for Fitness

As a Certified Wellness Coach and Exercise Physiologist, one of the biggest barriers I commonly hear with starting or sticking with an exercise plan is TIME. We live in a fast-paced, busy world and it can be daunting to think about how exercise can or will fit in with all your other obligations. Luckily, there is a 3-step process you can go through to make regular exercise a part of your reality.

1. FIND the Time
The first step is to map out your regular routine on a weekly planner or calendar, ideally one that is broken down into thirty-minute blocks. Begin by filling in your regular obligations – work (including any breaks!), sleep, recurring appointments or meetings, etc. Once you’ve filled in all of your regular obligations, look for the empty chunks of time. Notice where you may have an extra thirty minutes or an hour and look at these spaces as opportunities for fitness. This is the first step of finding time for fitness.

[Note: this could and should be done on a weekly basis so you can set yourself up for success. If you have a busier than normal schedule one week, you may realize you might not have time to get to the gym, but you might be more inclined to take a 20 minute walk around the block (and lose the “guilt” for not going to the gym because it wasn’t part of your plan!) On the flip side, your next week might not be as busy and you have more time to get to the gym. It really is all about balance, even when it comes to our time!]

2. MAKE the Time
Next, examine where the gaps in your schedule are and how these might align with some of the activities you are interested in. Perhaps you’ve always wanted to try Yoga, your work schedule is flexible and you notice your gym has a Wednesday Body Flow class over the lunch hour (hint, hint!). You might notice you have a gap every day when you get off work at 4:15 and before you pick the kids up at 5:30 that there’s a 30 minute HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training) class you could hit up (pun intended) at 4:30pm (another hint hint!). Or, you might see you have time for a 15 minute walk with the kids a few nights per week. Once you have found some activities that interest you, and that would fit into your schedule, make the time for them.

3. TAKE the Time
Now that you’ve identified free time in your schedule and decided on the fun fitness activities you would like to fill it with, it’s time to commit to your plan. Treat each workout with the same priority that you would an appointment for something important. Just like you need to show up and be prepared for others, it is vital to show up for yourself. Do whatever you need to do in order to keep these important appointments with yourself, whether it is setting reminders on your phone, having a workout buddy, or a wellness coach or personal trainer to hold you accountable (hint hint!)

Remember to frequently reflect on WHY you’ve decided fitness should be a priority in your life (wellness coaching can help with that!) so that you are able to maintain your focus. Repeat this process as often as needed for continued success!

 

Lindsey Peterson is a Certified Wellness Coach at Proximal50 Life Center. Lindsey coaches her clients to create sustainable lifestyle changes and to help them improve their overall well‐being. She provides support for creating realistic goals and navigating the challenges & obstacles that often get in our way.

Mental Health Monday: Gut Health

#4Mind4Body Mental Health Month Challenge

Mental health is essential to everyone’s overall health and well-being, and mental illnesses are common and treatable. So much of what we do physically impacts us mentally –it’s important to pay attention to both your physical health and your mental health, which can help you achieve overall wellness and set you on a path to recovery.

This May is Mental Health Month; Proximal50 Life Center is raising awareness about the connection between physical health and mental health, through the theme Fitness #4Mind4Body. The campaign is meant to educate and inform individuals about how eating healthy foods, gut health, managing stress, exercising, and getting enough sleep can go a long way in making you healthy all around.

A healthy lifestyle can help to prevent the onset or worsening of mental health conditions like depression and anxiety, as well as heart disease, diabetes, obesity and other chronic health problems. It can also play a big role in helping people recover from these conditions.

Getting the appropriate amount of exercise can help control weight, improve mental health, and help you live longer and healthier. Recent research is also connecting your nutrition and gut health with your mental health. Sleep also plays a critical role in all aspects of our life and overall health. Getting a good night’s sleep is important to having enough physical and mental energy to take on daily responsibilities. And we all know that stress can have a huge impact on all aspects of our health, so it’s important to take time to focus on stress-reducing activities like meditation or yoga.

Proximal50 Life Center wants everyone to know that mental illnesses are real, and recovery is always the goal. Living a healthy lifestyle may not be easy, but by looking at your overall health every day – both physically and mentally – you can go a long way in ensuring that you focus on your Fitness #4Mind4Body. For more information, visit www.mentalhealthamerica.net/may.

Call 751-2974 or click here to schedule your free consult and learn how the team of health professionals of Proximal50 can help you.

One More Rep: Lunges!

Ahhh lunges… you either love ’em or hate ’em. But let’s face it, they are one helluva a good way to target your legs.

Three reasons you should be doing lunges in your strength routine:

  1. Lunges mimic several of our daily movement patterns from kneeling down to help a child or tie your shoe to simply walking. Building strength through lunges will help you move better (and safer) throughout your day.
  2. Lunges also train muscular imbalances. In a squat your stronger leg can dominate, but in a lunge you work one leg at a time forcing you to build strength independently in each leg.
  3. Lunges challenge your balance and stabilizing muscles (including your core) important for total strength and injury prevention.

Now this isn’t to say squats and other leg exercises aren’t important too – just make sure lunges are working their way into your training routine.

Below are some trainer tips to get one more rep for a better lunge!

  1. Step forward with toes pointing straight ahead
  2. Lengthen up tall through your spine
  3. Tighten core & lift your chest
  4. Knee over toes – keep the knee stable & minimize side-to-side movement
  5. Drive through your front heel, keeping your weight out of your front toes
  6. Start with body weight lunges to focus on technique

 

 

Trainer Tip: Maximize Your Seated Rows!

The seated row is an excellent way to target your back muscles. Strengthening and developing a strong back side is important for muscle balance & posture. So much of what we do daily – computer work, house work, driving, planking 😉  – involve the muscles in our chest & shoulders. Targeting the muscles in the back counterbalance many of those movements. While it’s important to keep planking for core strength, make sure you are strengthening your back side too! 

Here are a few trainer tips to maximize your next set:

  • Keep upper body movement to a minimum
  • Stay tall through the torso
  • Keep shoulder blades back and squeezed
  • Think about using all your back muscles and triceps
  • If your forearm and biceps muscles burn out before the back muscles then you need to refocus the work to your back muscles

Here are two videos to illustrate the correct and incorrect posture in the a seated row. 

Potatoes – To Eat or Not to Eat?!

Do you know someone who doesn’t eat fruit or yogurt because of the sugar content, yet they will eat pretzels or rice cakes in unlimited amounts? There are so many misconceptions about carbs. If you are going to take one thing from this post: Carbs are not created equal. Here’s just one example – POTATOES!

All potatoes contain beneficial resistant starch. These resistant starches and fiber get fermented in the gut and produce short-chain fatty acids. Short-Chain Fatty Acids:

  • Keep you fuller longer
  • Increase mineral absorption and nutrient circulation
  • Prevent absorption of toxins
  • Decrease inflammation

Are you ready for this… Even. White. Potatoes.

When compared to a sweet potato, the overall nutritional value is similar but the type of nutrients vary. This means a variety of potatoes is important for a variety in nutrients. 

Some people have sworn off white potatoes because of their glycemic index  (a value assigned to foods based on how slowly or how quickly those foods cause an increase in blood sugar levels). But keep in mind that when it comes to the glycemic index and how your body responds, there are many things that come into play. This can vary depending on your cooking method, your sleep quality, genetics, activity level, time of day, medications, gut bacteria and the amount of protein, fiber and fat that’s eaten with the food item. So don’t get so consumed on this number.

Everything in moderation! So yes that means a meat and potatoes meal is not recommended daily (sorry!).  But here are ways to eat potatoes with a healthier twist:

  • Boiled
  • Roasted
  • Baked
  • Topped with olive oil and herbs
  • Topped with salt

Limit potatoes prepared:

  • As chips
  • Fried
  • “Loaded” with all the fixins’
  • With lots of cream and butter

Vanessa Lennick, RD, LRD
Registered Dietitian
Proximal50 Life Center

Want to know more? Ready to ditch the diet and find nutrition strategies that actually work for YOU? Ready to eat real food and enjoy it? Schedule a free consult with Vanessa online:

Online scheduling

Is Reset90 for me?

Reset90 is an 90 day online accountability group led by the team of wellness pros from Proximal50 Life Center. Reset90 is for you, if:

  • You’re looking to create healthy lifestyle habits that stick, like meal planning/prepping and/or incorporating more fruits and veggies
  • You’re lacking in the energy department
  • You’re struggling to get into a fitness routine and need some guidance
  • You’re trying to reduce your “cravings,” but just can’t seem to kick them
  • You’re looking for a community to support and push you towards your goals
  • You’re searching for a way to better manage stress
  • You’re tired of starting the newest fad diet only to end up right back where you started
  • You like the idea of a holistic approach to your health
  • You want to make long-term changes, without meal replacements, products & supplements.

Recipe ideas, meal planning tips, workouts, stress management tactics, education on underrated health topics that make a HUGE difference in your health, daily accountability and motivation – all of this for LESS THAN $10/WEEK! What are you waiting for?

We start February 19th –  Sign up today @ https://squareup.com/store/proximal50-life-center

Questions? Email Lindsey, Wellness Coach @ Proximal50 at lindsey.peterson@proximal50.com

Fiber: What You Need to Know

In an effort to make popular packaged foods healthier, manufacturers began adding beneficial nutrients to help improve the nutrition profile of commonly consumed foods. Fiber is common added nutrient and manufactures will often heavily market the product as being high in fiber. (think fiber-added yogurt)

However, there is concern that these isolated and sometimes synthetic added fibers don’t provide the same nutritional benefit as fiber found in whole plant sources.  The FDA has now come out with a new definition of Fiber. To be listed as fiber, the ingredient must have effects that are beneficial to human health.

The food industry has asked the FDA for a 3 year delay to update food labels to the new compliance standards. Until then, be aware of these commonly used isolated and synthetic non-digestible carbohydrates that don’t meet the new fiber definition:

Alginate
Apple fiber
Bamboo fiber
Carboxymethylcellulose
Corn Hull fiber
Cottonseed fiber
Galactooligosaccharides
Gum Acacia
Insulin/oligofructose/synthetic short-chain fructooligosacchrides
Karaya gum
Oat Hull Fiber
Pea Fiber
Polydextrose
Potato fiber
Pullulan
Rice Bran fiber
High-amylose corn/maize starch
Retrograded corn starch
Resistant wheat and maize starch
Soluble corn fiber
Soy fiber
Sugar beet fiber
Sugar cane fiber
Wheat fiber
Xanthan gum
Xylooligosaccharides

Strive to get different types of fibers for various benefits and to help meet recommended amounts by eating whole plant foods such as whole grains, pulses (beans, lentils, peas), vegetables, fruits, nuts and seeds.

Vanessa Lennick
Registered Dietitian
Proximal50 Life Center